FAQs

  • Sedation Dentistry FAQs.
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  • Dental Implant FAQs.
  • Invisalign FAQs.
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  • Crown & Bridges FAQs.
  • Root Canal Treatment FAQs.
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  • Teeth Whitening FAQs.

  • Sedation Dentistry FAQs


    1- What types of sedation do you use?

    We have three types of sedation dentistry which are a) Nitrous oxide b) Oral sedation c) General anesthesia. Ask us for more information or schedule a free consultation.

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    2- Will I remember anything after Sedation Dentistry?

    At the end of the treatment, you'll have little or no memory of what was accomplished.

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    3- Is Sedation Dentistry safe for me?

    Sedation dentistry protocols have been used safely for many years. Our dentist will review your medical history and monitor you closely while under sedation.

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    4- Will I feel any pain during the procedure?

    Most patients report no discomfort or memory of the experience at all and feel surprisingly good afterwards!

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    5- Can I wake up in the middle of a procedure?

    Patients can not just wake up without it being intended.One of our team members is always with you and your vital signs are monitored during the entire visit. You are never alone. On average, our treatments last two to six hours. This varies on the type of treatment that you require.

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    6- Will someone need to accompany me home?

    Yes, due to the sedative effects of the medications we use, you will need someone to drive you to and from our office.

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    Dental Implant FAQs


    1- How can I tell if I am healthy enough to have dental implants?

    Generally speaking, if a person is well enough to undergo the treatment necessary for fixed bridgework or routine tooth extractions, the same person can undergo dental implant procedures. Also, patients may have general health conditions that would contraindicate implant procedures, although this is unusual. The best form of implant for you is determined after a thorough examination and discussion with your dentist and periodontist or oral surgeon. The amount and location of available bone is usually the major determinant as to which implant system is to be used, or whether you are a good implant candidate.

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    2- Where dental implants are concerned, are there risks of the body rejecting them?

    When people hear the word "rejection" in connection with implants, they are usually describing conditions that can occur where there has been surgery that involves transplanting a vital organ such as a heart. However, dental implants fall into an entirely different category due to the fact that tissue matching, blood typing, etc., is not a factor as in the other procedures mentioned. The body completely accepts placement of dental implant material (like orthopedic materials which are similar) within bone; therefore, today's dental implants meet with great success. Obviously, there are some dental implants that have not been successful. However, success has more to do with proper patient selection, proficiency of the practitioner, and the patient's commitment to proper hygiene and preventive maintenance. Another factor in success involves regular follow-up care, just like other dental treatment. Both soft tissue health and the way the replacement teeth function and bite together must be evaluated periodically to ensure long term success of the dental implant.

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    3- How long will implants last?

    They should last a lifetime. However, we all can sight examples where teeth have not served for a person's lifetime. We know that dental problems mostly stem from improper home care or lack of treatment when needed. The same holds true for implants. With proper care and routine dental check-ups they should last a lifetime. No one can give guarantees because the health of a person is dependent upon many factors which are out of the control of one's dentist, e.g., proper nutritional needs being met, proper hygiene, genetics, disease processes which might occur. So, the answer to this question really is that no one knows how long each individual implant will last... one's success can be influenced by the way you live and the quality of practitioner that you have chosen to do your implants... these things can tip the scales in your favor.

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    4- Do implants require special care?

    Presume that dental implants are natural teeth and treat them that way. Return for regular check-ups. Brush and floss. Realize also, that caring for the gums is the best way to care for one's teeth. More teeth are lost as a result of gum disease than any other single cause.

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    5- Is the placement of implants painful? How long does it take?

    Implant placement usually does not result in much post-operative discomfort -usually the patient takes Tylenol or Advil for about 2-5 days. If more extensive treatment is needed, for example bone grafts or many implants, then the post-operative course may require more time and medication. Anesthesia during the surgery should make the placement procedure pain-free. We are conservative with anesthetic agents and our philosophy is to utilize the least amount of medication for the patient to comfortably tolerate the procedures. Depending on the complexity and number of implants being placed, the procedure can take between 30 minutes to 3-4 hours.

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    6- How long does the whole dental implant process take? Will I be without teeth or unable to eat for a long time?

    The first phase of treatment, after a detailed evaluation and treatment plan, usually is the actual placement of the implants. This procedure is generally done in the doctor's office during one visit. Most implants will remain covered, underneath the gums, for 3 to 6 months. During this time, osseointegration --the biological bonding of the jawbone to the implant--occurs. Through this healing period, you will probably wear your modified denture or a temporary denture or bridge and maintain normal activities without restriction. You will need to follow a modified, soft diet for the first couple of weeks. There are occasions, one stage implant placements or when extensive bone grafting is to be performed, when patients may be asked not to wear their removable dentures for a period of time. When this is necessary we'll do all we can to help our patient through this transition.

    The second phase of the procedure is usually 3-6 months after implant placement. At this time, the top of the implants will be uncovered from under the gums and a small metal post or extension will be attached to the implant(s). Your periodontist or restorative dentist will make any necessary modifications to your temporary teeth to allow you to continue wearing them after post attachment.

    In the third phase, which usually starts 2-6 weeks after the second phase, your new replacement teeth are created and fitted. This phase involves a series of appointments to make impressions of your mouth and to "try-in" your replacement teeth at key steps in their fabrication. The try-in sessions are necessary to ensure that the size, shape, color and fit of your new teeth will completely blend with and match your individual facial characteristics and remaining natural teeth (if any). The third phase is usually completed within 4 to 8 weeks. Total treatment time for most implant cases will usually be 5-8 months. It could be longer if bone or gum procedures are needed.

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    7- I've heard that dental implants are experimental - is that true?

    Absolutely not! Dental implants have a long history of use and success. Implants are the most thoroughly researched procedure in the history of dentistry and, while no procedure is 100% successful, the current technology has resulted in very high success rates in the hands of well-trained and experienced clinicians. Dental implants are carefully regulated by the FDA and a number of implant systems have been approved by the American Dental Association.

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    8- I've heard that dental implants are expensive. How much do they cost?

    The procedure can involve a significant investment, with surgical fees ranging from $1,800 and up for a single tooth replacement (when the implant crown is added the cost is about the same as a conventional "3-tooth bridge") to $5,000 and up for replacement of multiple missing teeth. However, the cost of non-treatment can be considerably more expensive. Continual bone loss occurs from the wearing of full dentures (plates) and partials. This progressive loss of bone can eventually cause nerve exposure, jaw fracture and a complete inability to function with regular dentures. Correction at this point may be very expensive and can involve extensive bone grafts, which may require hospitalization and an extended recovery period. Placing implants before the bone loss becomes severe not only saves money in the long run, but also slows the bone loss process, increasing the likelihood of long term success.

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    9- I must have some teeth extracted and I intend to have implants placed to restore my ability to chew. Can a dental implant be placed at the same visit as the teeth are extracted?

    Whether or not the dental implant can be placed immediately after extraction depends on the amount of available bone in the area and presence or absence of active infection. Placing the implant at the same visit helps preserve both width and height of bone and may prevent the need for placing bone grafts when bone naturally shrinks back after teeth are extracted. During the first year after teeth have been removed, as much as 40% of jawbone width can be lost. Sometimes, infection from a tooth or periodontal disease has destroyed the bone to such an extent that it becomes necessary to do a bone grafting procedure prior to implant placement. If it is possible to place the implant at the same visit as the teeth are extracted, this can save at least three months in healing time compared to waiting for an extraction site to heal before the implants can be placed.

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    10- Why do dentures lose their fit?

    In many cases, the pressure of dentures or partials on the tissues causes gums to get "flabby" and bone to shrink over time. When this occurs, the dentures usually become loose and awkward even when adhesives are applied, much like the way clothes become baggy when one loses weight, and this causes more bone loss and gum problems. With dental implants, bone loss as well as gum erosion are slowed. Unlike dentures, which put pressure and stress on top of the gums and jaw bone, endosseous ("in-the-bone") implants are actually surrounded by bone and the chewing forces transfer pressures into the bone, much like teeth do. This actually can strengthen the bone and increase bone density, reducing the bone shrinkage seen regularly from dentures.

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    11- I have a tooth that is broken and my dentist recommended extraction and a bridge, but I'm not excited about grinding down the perfectly good teeth on each side to make a bridge --could an implant work here?

    Most likely an implant could work very well in this situation. Filing down teeth weakens them and makes them more susceptible to decay, gum problems and possible root canals. Sometimes a bridge is still the best alternative, but an implant can often be a better option. An implant will be easier to clean and floss, won't require attachment to or damage other teeth and is as close as we can come to naturally giving you back your missing tooth.

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    12- Can any dentist give me an implant?

    Legally yes, but like any medical or dental procedure, not all practitioners have equal experience, training or comfort with implant treatment. Also, for every procedure, there is a "learning curve" and you want practitioners with significant experience to help you with implant treatment so you are likely to get the best possible long term result.

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    13- I need to replace two missing teeth next to each other. Can I just have one implant placed and attach it to one of my natural teeth and make a bridge?

    Generally, this is not a good idea-over the years we have learned that it is generally much better not to attach implants to teeth. We frequently attach implants to each other, which can improve strength and works well. So in a case like this, although it may be more expensive in the short term to place two implants instead of one, the long-term success is likely to be much better with the two implants.

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    14- I am missing most of my back teeth and do not wish to lose any of my remaining front teeth. I've been through several sets of removable partials and could not wear any of them. Could I have teeth that stay in all the time to replace my teeth missing in the back and keep my remaining teeth in front?

    Your situation is very common. First of all we will do everything possible to help you keep your remaining natural teeth as long as their supporting structures are within an acceptable range. Supporting structures means the gum and bone tissues immediately surrounding the tooth. A thorough evaluation must be made to determine if a tooth is healthy enough to keep or not. We do not want remaining unhealthy teeth to compromise the success of any new treatment performed whether it be dental implants or other treatment. We must then decide what is best for your specific needs in order to restore your missing back teeth. If you have had problems with removable partials, then dental implants used to anchor new replacement teeth may be the best answer for you.

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    15- I lost my upper back teeth on one side and have gone for years without doing anything about it. My sinuses always seem to bother me more on that side than on the side that I have back teeth. Could these problems be related to one another?

    A phenomena that occurs in a large majority of people who have had their upper back teeth missing for a long period of time is the increasing downward growth of the maxillary sinus. At birth it is the size of a pea, and progressively grows as the skull matures. This growth is at the expense of the surrounding bone. If you are considering replacing those upper back teeth with fixed teeth that stay in all the time, it may be necessary to perform a sinus elevation procedure to allow room for placement of dental implants into this area to support those teeth. This involves placement of bone and/or bone substitutes into an area which was previously occupied by the lower part of the maxillary sinus. These bone graft materials act as a matrix or scaffold which is replaced by the patient's own new bone. This raises the floor of the sinus, reduces sinus volume and may allow the sinus to drain easier. Most importantly, this procedure increases the available bone use to place implants and restore the missing back teeth.

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    16- Both of my parents have worn complete dentures for many years, as have my grandparents. Recently, I lost two of my teeth. Does this mean that I will eventually have to have dentures?

    Tradition seems to say that someday we will lose our teeth and then succumb to the inevitable denture. Today the reality is that we can essentially keep all of our teeth throughout our lives... But what about those, such as yourself, who have either already lost some or all of their teeth or are about to? Dental implants could be the answer. We can replace single teeth, several teeth in a section of the jaw, or entire arches of teeth. Some people are more prone to tooth decay or periodontal disease and more apt to lose teeth than others are. If you have a family history of denture use, you should make every effort to save your teeth -and you may never need dentures. If you do lose one or more teeth, implants may be a good option to prevent the need for dentures.

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    17- I've had dentures for several years and have lost a lot of jawbone. My lower dentures are floaters and I need help. Is there still hope for me?

    In most cases, with the new options available today in the field of dental implants, some form of treatment can be done. We encourage people to get help as soon as possible if they are already having some problems with their current situation. These problems include: excessive use of denture adhesives, chewing only soft food, unable to taste some foods, constant mouth sores, unhappy with the appearance of one's teeth and bite position (in some cases the nose and chin getting closer together). The sooner the problems are corrected with dental implants the more choices one has available for treatment. If you have any or all of the above symptoms, implants could very well be the answer for you.

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    18- I have been a denture wearer for many years now and use denture adhesives to hold my teeth in place and am getting tired of the constant bad taste and mess in my mouth. Could dental implants eliminate using adhesives?

    A common complaint is having to constantly add adhesives to secure dentures, especially after drinking a cup of coffee or eating a meal. This can really be a nuisance when eating out at a restaurant and having to excuse yourself from the table to go to the rest room because your dentures won't stay in. Laughing, sneezing and coughing can also cause trouble for people who depend on adhesives to hold their teeth in place. It may be funny to see another person having a denture fall out, but it is not funny to the person who has to deal with these embarrassing situations on a daily basis. Denture wearers with problems such as these are not alone. There are 30 million people in the United States with no teeth and 29% in this group chew only soft foods.

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    19- I have a full set of dentures. My uppers are fine, but my lowers are constantly a juggling act when I try to eat. Can I have implants on the lower and keep a full denture on top?

    Absolutely. Your situation is a common one. The full lower denture is the most unstable prosthesis fabricated in dental practice. During chewing, the average lower denture moves five times more than an upper denture. The person with advanced bone loss has additional problems of poor muscle coordination, speech difficulties, and inability to keep the denture in place, all of which adversely influence a normal lifestyle. Dental implants can be the solution to all of these problems. Even in cases where a lot of bone loss has occurred there still is a good chance something can be done. In most cases, a thorough oral exam and a panoramic x-ray is all that is needed to determine if you are a good candidate for implants.

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    20- I am missing all of my teeth and am now wearing a full upper and lower denture. I can no longer tolerate my lowers. Will I need an implant for every tooth I am replacing on the lower jaw?

    It is not necessary to have an implant for every tooth that is being replaced. The number of implants necessary to provide support depends on the type of implants used and the type of teeth (removable vs. non- removable) that will be attached to the implants. For example in this case, if you're a good candidate for endosseous (in-the-bone) implants, you may require between 2-8 implants, depending on the technique used to support a full compliment of lower teeth. A thorough oral exam and panoramic x-ray is all that is necessary in most cases, to determine which implant can be used and how many must be used. Sometimes additional x-rays or CT scans are used in more complicated cases.

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    21- My husband lost all his teeth from gum disease. He refuses to wear "false teeth". Would implants give him the look and function of natural teeth?

    It is possible to replace an entire arch of teeth with non-removable teeth supported by dental implants. Each individual presents a different combination of factors and these factors will determine which type of implant will be best suited for them. The end result is the elimination of the denture as we now know it. The ability to function socially and eat properly is the driving force behind the development of dental implants. These procedures will provide you with stable teeth, in many cases, for the first time in years. A removable denture can be retained and supported by several implants joined by a bar or the missing teeth can be restored with fixed or removable bridges anchored to 5 to 8 implants. Implants are a viable and functional way to help improve one's quality of life and health.

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    22- I consulted a dentist several years ago about using dental implants to replace my lower denture and he told me that I did not have adequate bone available to place enough in-the-bone implants without danger of fracturing my now fragile jawbone. Are there any alternatives?

    Because of the advances in the field of dental implantology, there are now more choices and techniques. It's the rare person that cannot receive an implant or a combination of implants. Today we have available many types of implants designed to accommodate multiple problems. As an example, if adequate bone is not available in the front or the back part or the jaw for in-the-bone implants, an over-the-bone type implant can be placed in both areas and non-removable teeth can be made to attach to the implants. Over-the-bone implants have been used successfully in dentistry for over 30 years. An implant of this type also has the added advantage of strengthening a fragile jawbone, which can help prevent a fracture. The ability to utilize multiple implant techniques is an essential ingredient to the successful use of implants. No one design will cover all situations. Bone grafting techniques have improved remarkably and in many instances we can do these procedures in our office. Bone grafts can strengthen the jaw and supply additional bone for implant placement.

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    23- I can't keep my upper denture in place for very long without gagging. I also can't taste or feel the temperature or texture of food very well, so eating is not the pleasure it once was -can implants help me?

    Probably. Upper dentures cover the roof of the mouth and go back to the soft palate to get support and "seal" so they will stay in place. Unfortunately, this results in covering up the palate and many taste buds. By using implants to anchor or support an upper prosthesis (either removable or nor-removable replacement teeth), the roof of the mouth can be left uncovered so one won't gag, and can feel the texture, temperature, and taste of foods and beverages much better.

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    24- I had a root canal on a tooth that fractured and now it has to be removed. Can it be replaced with an implant or do I have to have a bridge or a partial?

    Teeth that have root canals can fracture more easily than other teeth because they are weaker and somewhat dehydrated. They can sometimes be as brittle as glass. In the past the best available treatment was to remove the tooth and file down the adjacent teeth and make a bridge - caps on the adjacent teeth with an attached "dummy" tooth in between. Sometimes this still is the only way. However, in many cases an implant can replace the fractured tooth and no teeth need to be ground down at all.

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    Invisalign / Clear Braces FAQs


    1- Does Invisalign really work?

    Yes. In both clinical research and in orthodontic and dental practices around the world, Invisalign has been proven effective at straightening teeth. Over a million patients have either been treated or are in treatment and over 44,000 orthodontists and dentists have been trained on how to use Invisalign.

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    2- Does Invisalign work as well as normal braces?

    In most cases, Invisalign has proven to be as effective at straightening teeth as traditional braces. The level of Invisalign experience will determine how an orthodontist or dentist decides how to treat a patient, be it with Invisalign or traditional braces. Some severe cases may require treatment using Invisalign together with another teeth straightening technique.

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    3- How does Invisalign work?

    Invisalign uses 3-D computer imaging technology to depict the complete treatment plan from the initial position to the final desired position from which a series of custom-made “aligners” are produced. Each aligner moves teeth incrementally and is worn for about two weeks, then replaced by the next in the series until the final position is achieved.

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    4- What are the primary benefits of Invisalign?

    There are four primary benefits of Invisalign:

  • a- Invisalign is nearly invisible, you can straighten your teeth without anyone knowing.

  • b- Invisalign is removable, you can eat and drink what you want in treatment; you can also brush and floss normally to maintain good

  • oral hygiene.

  • c- Invisalign is comfortable, there are no metal brackets or wires to cause mouth irritation: no metal or wires also means you spend

  • less time in the doctor's chair getting adjustments.

  • d- Invisalign allows you to view your own virtual treatment plan before you start, so you can see how your straight teeth will look

  • when your treatment is complete.

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    5- What are aligners made of?

    Aligners are made of clear, strong medical grade non-toxic plastic that is virtually invisible when worn.

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    6- What do aligners look like?

    Aligners are nearly invisible and look similar to clear tooth-whitening trays, but are custommade for a better fit to move teeth.

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    7- How long will treatment take?

    The length of treatment is dependent on the severity of individual cases. Treatment may vary from anywhere between six months to two years with an average treatment taking around 12 to 14 months.

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    8- Is this a new way to straighten teeth?

    For years, orthodontists have used removable appliances for limited treatment. Today, with the application of computer technology and mass-customised manufacturing, Invisalign is able to treat a broader range of cases with greater precision.

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    9- Do orthodontists and dentists need special training in order to use Invisalign?

    While Invisalign can be used with virtually any treatment philosophy, specific training is needed. All orthodontists and dentists interested in treating patients with Invisalign must attend a training course before cases will be accepted from their office.

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    10- How does Invisalign effectively move teeth?

    Like brackets and arch wires, the Invisalign aligner moves teeth through the appropriate placement of controlled force on the teeth. The principal difference is that Invisalign not only controls forces, but also controls the timing of the force application. At each stage, only certain teeth are allowed to move, and these movements are determined by the orthodontic treatment plan for that particular stage. This results in an efficient force delivery system.

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    11- Have Invisalign conducted clinical tests or studies?

    As is typical of medical product introductions, Invisalign conducted extensive testing prior to commercially releasing the product. Various US universities have conducted clinical studies and numerous clinical articles have been published by US and Canadian orthodontists.

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    12- How much does Invisalign cost?

    Invisalign is a premium product compared to traditional braces. It uses state of the art technology to create a series of customised aligners for each patient and has significant patient benefits. The cost of treatment is determined by the prescribing orthodontist or dentist and is based upon the complexity of treatment required.

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    13- Will there be an initial consultation fee?

    We offer a free initial consultation.

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    14- What is the minimum age that Invisalign can treat?

    Almost all teenagers over the age of 14 are eligible for treatment with Invisalign as long as their second (twelve year old) molars are fully erupted.

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    15- Does the procedure work on overbites (overjets) and how?

    Yes, Invisalign can correct mild to moderate overbites. The aligners create a force on the front teeth causing them to intrude, thus correcting the overbite.

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    16- Are crowns a factor in Invisalign treatment?

    No, crowns are usually not a factor in Invisalign treatment. However, small composites called attachments are sometimes bonded onto teeth to help achieve certain movements. In these cases, the location of crowns must be carefully evaluated by an Invisalign orthodontist or dentist.

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    17- Will the treatment be painful?

    Most people experience temporary, minor discomfort for a few days at the beginning of each new stage of treatment. This is normal and is typically described as a feeling of pressure. It is a sign that the Invisalign aligners are working and sequentially moving your teeth to their final destination. This discomfort typically goes away a couple of days after you insert the new aligner in the series.

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    18- Will wearing the Invisalign aligners affect my speech?

    Like all orthodontic treatments, aligners may temporarily affect the speech of some people, and you may have a slight lisp for a day or two. However, as your tongue gets used to having aligners in your mouth, any lisp or minor speech impediment caused by the aligners should disappear.

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    19-Are there restrictions on what I can eat while in treatment?

    No. Unlike traditional orthodontics, you can usually eat whatever you desire while in treatment because you remove your aligners to eat and drink. Thus, there is no need to restrict your consumption of any of your favourite foods and snacks, unless instructed otherwise by your orthodontist or dentist. Also, it is important that you brush your teeth after each meal and prior to re-inserting your aligners to maintain proper hygiene.

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    20- How often must I wear my aligners?

    Aligners should be worn all day, except when eating, brushing and flossing.

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    21- What happens after treatment to prevent my teeth from moving again?

    This depends on the outcome of the treatment. Some patients might need a positioner, or conventional retainer. Other patients might need a clear plastic retainer similar to Invisalign aligners. Discuss these possibilities with your treating orthodontist or dentist. Every patient is different and outcomes vary

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    Crown & Bridges FAQs


    1- In considering a bridge, why is a crown employed?

    Having a crown made for you and inserted over your tooth like a cap, saves the tooth and avoids having an unnecessary extraction. The crown strengthens a tooth that has been compromised by large fillings or dental decay and trauma.

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    2- Crowns are made in different materials. Which is better for me?

    The latest technology creates crowns made with porcelain material. This makes the tooth look and feel very natural and improves the appearance of the smile. While an amalgam or metal allow shows the extent of dental work, a porcelain crown will have a white reflective shine, mimicking your own teeth.

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    3- Will the crown be obvious when I smile?

    If the crown is made from porcelain, it can be made to exactly match the shade and shape of your other teeth so that it blends in with the adjacent teeth, making it difficult to discern from the surrounding ones. When the lining is porcelain as well, then even though the gum line may recede (which is typical in the aging process), the crown will look like your other teeth.

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    4- What role do crowns play in bridge attachments?

    Crowns are generally placed on the two teeth adjacent to the bridge to be attached for strength to these teeth. Then the bridge, constructed with one or more artificial teeth, is attached to the teeth being covered, spanning the gap in between. Metal bands connect the crowns to the artificial tooth, holding it in the proper place. Unfortunately, some healthy tissue in the adjacent teeth is removed to make room for the appliance.

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    5- How long do bridges last?

    Bridges can last more than ten years if proper oral hygiene is maintained.

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    6- How do I care for my crown or bridge?

    While a crowned tooth does not require any special care, you should continue to follow good oral hygiene practices, including brushing your teeth at least twice a day and flossing once a day - especially around the crown area where the gum meets the tooth. Bridges are cemented in place, so they cannot be removed for cleaning. To keep the teeth healthy, the gap under a bridge must be cleaned daily using special dental floss - an ordinary toothbrush will not do the job. Your dentist will demonstrate how to use floss under your bridge.

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    Root Canal Treatment FAQs


    1- When do I need a Root Canal?

    Do you have any of the following symptoms?

  • Sensitivity to hot or cold that lingers.

  • Discomfort when chewing or biting.

  • Dull ache or severe pain.

  • Discomfort that wakes you up at night.

  • If you answered yes to any of the above, you might very well need a root canal. Please call and schedule for an evaluation. Be aware not all teeth that are in need of root canal therapy will cause pain. It is possible to be pain-free and still need a root canal.

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    2- Will it hurt during the procedure?

    With modern techniques and varied local anesthetic solutions it is rare to have any sensation in the tooth during treatment. For the first few days after treatment, It is normal for your tooth to be sensitive to biting. This discomfort can be relieved with over-the-counter or prescription medications in order to control normal post-treatment discomfort.

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    3- Will it hurt afterward?

    In most cases the discomfort will subside dramatically within the first 24-48 hours. Any sensitivity to cold, hot or even breathing air "in" will be gone after your visit. Nevertheless, you may experience mild discomfort to pressure that could last for several days after treatment. Taking over-the-counter anti-inflammatory analgesics such as ibuprofen (aka Advil, Motrin), naproxen (aka Aleve) or aspirin (aka Excedrin) usually relieves this discomfort. Tylenol has been proven not to be as effective as ibuprofen and related medicines , because it does not have the anti-inflammatory component.

    The most common predictor of post-treatment pain is pre-treatment pain. If the tooth is already hurting the root canal procedure will remove the cause and allow healing to begin. During the first 72 - 96 h we will prescribe an analgesic regimen that should allow you to begin healing pain-free.

    The most common complaint is tenderness to touch, bite, tapping or chewing on the tooth. It is always best to chew on the other side until a permanent restoration replaces the temporary restoration.

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    Teeth Whitening FAQs


    1- How many shades whiter can I expect my teeth to get?

    The amount of whitening varies from client to client and cannot be predicted or guaranteed; but in general use, teeth may lighten anywhere from 6 to 12 shades on the whitening shade guide. The results depend greatly on how discolored the teeth were originally. Yellow or brown teeth, surface stains, and uniformly darkened teeth are easiest to whiten. Additional whitening treatments may be needed in order to achieve the desired shade, especially with heavily stained teeth.

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